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Author Topic: 65' Mustang GT  (Read 507178 times)
dennis112
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« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2011, 08:21:54 am »

Thanks everyone.

Anyone can learn body work if they put there mind to it.  Unfortunately it is very dirty and time consuming so most people give up quickly.  I say that it sucks (and it does.)  I am self taught and started when I was 16 on my first Mustang when it was in an accident and my mother told me to fix the darn thing.  Throughout the years I added to my skill set and have done several complete restorations which included all the mechanical and paint work. 

The body of this car was restored was 30 years ago-by me.  When I bought it for $120 it was pretty clapped out.  Had a blown 69' 351w installed and no transmission.  I stripped the paint and did all the work by hand without the benefit of air tools.  I painted it late at night in a service garage where I was a mechanic.  It really didn't turn out bad and still looked great 5 years ago (just before I got the urge to go drag racing):




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Dennis

65' Stang, 434W NA, Victor Heads, Super Vic Intake, 11:1, Braswell Carb, Bullet SR Cam, G101A 4-Speed, 4:56 rear, 93 Octane Pump Gas  9.82@138.00
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« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2011, 10:53:22 am »

The fact you kept the paint on for so long speaks volumes.  Most people can paint a car, but getting it to not peel after so many years is a work of art.
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68 Mustang 310 twisted wedge 170, tfs1, weiand stealth, 1.6 rr t5 3.55s with a locker, a/c and all the creature comforts.

On a serious note.. wagon made 3000hp on the dyno
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« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2011, 11:41:13 am »

Time, tools,and talent go a long way!
Awesome build, love seeing something done well, it's encouraging for those of us with rusty rides!
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« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2011, 12:12:07 pm »

really nice job.

the pics lead me to think I would consider adding a gusset to the rear spring perches


any goals for the front suspension?
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dennis112
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« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2011, 04:51:15 pm »

Thanks guys. 

really nice job.

the pics lead me to think I would consider adding a gusset to the rear spring perches

any goals for the front suspension?

The spring perches do have a gusset, although it wouldn't hurt to add another if desired.  Remember that the torque is applied to the front spring and the rear is mostly there to help support some of the weight.  If I find that the perch is a weak link, I am going to box the rear frame and run sliders instead.

No plans for the front suspension at this time, although coil overs interest me.  Front already has roller spring perches, 6 cylinder coil springs, good 90/10 shocks, disc brakes, and I run without a sway bar. 
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Dennis

65' Stang, 434W NA, Victor Heads, Super Vic Intake, 11:1, Braswell Carb, Bullet SR Cam, G101A 4-Speed, 4:56 rear, 93 Octane Pump Gas  9.82@138.00
dennis112
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« Reply #20 on: May 01, 2011, 06:23:41 pm »

Next up is the fiberglass hood.  I am not really that fond of this hood but it is what I have and it does clear the engine. Until I decide what I really want, it will have to do. With that in mind, it needed some attention.

The hood bowed quite a bit on the sides and I discovered that the underframe had buckled. I decided that the best course of action was to sand off the Gelcoat and do an exploratory. It wasn't long before I found that the frame was cracked. I started to cut out the crack with a grinder and soon realized why the thing had buckled--The frame was a single layer of fiberglass and engine heat had probably led to its demise. Since the top side of the hood was not damaged, I decided a course of action.

I first clamped the hood on my sawhorses in a way that straightened the top of the hood. This was a grit-my-teeth situation where I was hoping that I had instilled the right amount of bend. Then I cut out a 2 foot length of the top of the subframe and installed a length of treated wood 1x3 as far as I could make it go from the hinge toward the front of the hood for support. Next I covered the 1x3's with multiple layers of fiberglass matting the full length of the frame. The wood was probably overkill, but I needed something to form the glass over. Here is what I ended up with:





Primered:



I also disliked the 1/2" gap that was found at the rear of the hood where it met the cowl. As a correction I decided to build it up using multiple thin cut strips of fiberglass matting:







That ended up being a time consuming effort as I probably used 30-40 of the short thin strips to get about an 1/8" of build up from side to side. The masking tape was used to help keep the strips from sliding off the edge of the hood (which was stood on its nose during build-up.)

After I was satisfied with the amount of build-up I added a layer of glass matting on the hood's top surface and then ground it down flat:



Since the build-up appeared to be even with only a few minor imperfections, I added polyester body filler over the repair. This helps seal the fiberglass similar to the gel coat.

At the same time I repaired a dip found on top of the hood. After removing the Gelcoat a close examination showed that the top fabric had been seamed there at the factory. Since the dip wasn't too deep, I did an initial build up with short strand fiberglass filler and followed it with polyester body filler which is far easier to sand:





The hood was allowed to dry overnight and then it was remounted on the car. I think that it turned out fairly well after some hinge readjustments. It now matches the contour of the fender. Also note that it matches the headlight bezels even better than the stock metal hood ever did:



Just as importantly is that the rear lines of the hood match up pretty well and I am glad that it worked out so well:







One I was satisfied with the fit of the hood, I blocked out the whole car with a long board and 80gr sandpaper, followed by 180 grit.  Curved areas were sanded using a rubber sponge wrapped with sandpaper:







Areas where I broke through the primer and hit metal where spot primed with an epoxy base:





Hit a couple of places on the hood too:



Then the whole car was given 4 coats of fresh primer surfacer:





The valances and head light surrounds where primered off the car:





Since the body appears to be very straight, I went ahead and sprayed a light guide coat of black primer all over.  This will help me when I final sand for paint:











Afterwards the car was stripped of the fenders and hood for the final time.  Today I started fine sanding various parts in anticipation of applying some red paint in various areas later this week. 
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Dennis

65' Stang, 434W NA, Victor Heads, Super Vic Intake, 11:1, Braswell Carb, Bullet SR Cam, G101A 4-Speed, 4:56 rear, 93 Octane Pump Gas  9.82@138.00
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« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2011, 07:07:32 pm »

Dennis,  the car is looking great...i like eveything you have done with it !  The body is looking slick !!
keep up the good work and good luck with your recovery from knee surgery !!!

 Darren
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« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2011, 08:53:25 pm »

Looking good Dennis.  I went thru this a few years ago with mine.  Not gonna happen again that's for sure.  Can't wait to see it when it's done.

Take care,
James
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« Reply #23 on: May 04, 2011, 01:46:49 pm »

That work done to the hood is excellent!  My hood never fit right and is a mess since the frame broke loose of the top after forgetting my hood pins and driving down the street a while ago.
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\'65 fastback pump gas 289, 4.56 gears, and faceplated T5.  11.123 at 122.4
dennis112
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« Reply #24 on: May 04, 2011, 05:33:46 pm »

Thank you guys for the kind comments.

My hood never fit right and is a mess since the frame broke loose of the top after forgetting my hood pins and driving down the street a while ago.

I have never messed too much with fiberglass except to continually repair the front spoiler on the car (which was given to me in pieces in the first place.  I've always read that it was easy and indeed it was.  Now I believe that anything fiberglass is repairable.  It is a little time consuming though as the resin is supposed to sit for 6 hours before sanding.  I do like how the matting basically disappears after it has set up and is being contour sanded.  What would be even cooler is to have a gelcoat gun as they seemed to be able to hid a lot of imperfections with it.  

Since I had such good luck messing with fiberglass this time, in the future I might try cutting the upper part of the scoop off, brace it above the hood an inch or so higher than it currently is, and then fill in the gap with glass.  Won't be during the race year though as I am going to miss enough of them anyways.
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Dennis

65' Stang, 434W NA, Victor Heads, Super Vic Intake, 11:1, Braswell Carb, Bullet SR Cam, G101A 4-Speed, 4:56 rear, 93 Octane Pump Gas  9.82@138.00
dennis112
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« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2011, 07:53:53 pm »

Found out that if you plan you jobs right, even being laid up with minor knee surgery won't hold you back when you are bored. The bar stool and the sit down rolling seat have been a saving grace for my sanity. All I have to do is crutch myself to the garage and then sit to sand, sand, sand.

Started by hand sanding the door jambs and lower cowl:








   
Moved on to the front fenders:



Got tired sanding stuff and and was dieing to spray a little red paint, so I jambed the fenders:







I like to do that so that I know hidden or hard to reach areas have a good protective coat of paint. One less worry when I get around to painting the whole car.

The inner fenders will receive a light coat of undercoating before being installed the final time.

I decided that painting the door jambs was probably not a good idea until I had sprayed the trunk due to possible over-spray, so I sanded it next, being careful with the 400gr to not break through the primer coat. A good tell tail sign that the primer was getting thin was when I sanded through the light colored primer into the darker gray base epoxy primer in places:







When satisfied, I broke out the masking tape and paper:







I was finally ready for more paint. First the inner part of the doors/quarter panels were coated (which will ultimately allow me to reassemble the side windows):





Then I headed for the trunk and somehow crawled up through the gas tank opening to lay on 3 coats of beautiful red paint. I also sprayed the rear window channel and what remains of the speaker panel:



Care was taken so that areas that are nearly hidden, like the top of the wheel wells, had adequate paint coverage:











The roll bar will be painted crinkle black again later.

I didn't forget where the trunk migrates into the passenger compartment:







It turned out quite nice and is almost too pretty to be hidden underneath a trunk lid.
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Dennis

65' Stang, 434W NA, Victor Heads, Super Vic Intake, 11:1, Braswell Carb, Bullet SR Cam, G101A 4-Speed, 4:56 rear, 93 Octane Pump Gas  9.82@138.00
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« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2011, 08:33:05 pm »

this post is awesome,  the more i read of it the more updates i want, hurry up and get more photos up mate!

serioulsy though thats a great job and the trunk/rear seat area looks fantastic......not bad for a guy with a bung knee!!!!!
you got to be happy with the result,

Just a question, im looking at painting the trunk in a similar fashion to you, how did you go sanding the inner rear quarters, mine has what looks like body deadener sparayed in there and doesnt want to budge.    im trying to do the trunk with theoutside already painted to for what its worth.
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if it aint fun why bother!!!!
dennis112
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« Reply #27 on: May 05, 2011, 08:49:17 pm »

Thank you.  The paint stage gets me excited too as it is the icing on the cake.  It shows the full results of all the prep work.

My car also has a splash of sound deadner on its quarters.  On this car I used scotchbright to rough it up before a coat of primer was applied.  That was scotchbrighted before paint.  On other cars I sprayed a fresh, even coat of deadner on it before primer and paint. On this car I did not wish to add any more additional weight.
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Dennis

65' Stang, 434W NA, Victor Heads, Super Vic Intake, 11:1, Braswell Carb, Bullet SR Cam, G101A 4-Speed, 4:56 rear, 93 Octane Pump Gas  9.82@138.00
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« Reply #28 on: May 05, 2011, 09:10:23 pm »

Simply awesome, Dennis!  VERY envious, here!   
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« Reply #29 on: May 05, 2011, 10:46:21 pm »

Wow man, that's professional quality work you're doing!  I have a loooong way to go before I'd ever think of trying that with my '65.  I appreciate all of the pictures and explanations, it makes it much easier for a body work noob like me to follow.  Good luck with the rest.
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I'm Rob.  Working on my '93 Reef Blue coupe.  Stock internal 302, 80 MAF, 75 TB, Victor 5.0, High Ports, 30# inj., B303, 1.6s, Tremec TKO 3550, Quicktime bell, Fidanza Al flywheel, stage 3 ceramic clutch, & 4.10s.  12.68 @ 111.69
'66 F100 shortbed, 352ci, 3 on the tree - on hold
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