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 11 
 on: July 27, 2018, 07:01:07 pm 
Started by gresse - Last post by dennis112
Part of my reply disappeared in the process????

Anyways the difference in pressure of the new valve that you found could be due to not having the same installed height as Comp specifies.  If the height is taller, the pressure will be less.  As far as comparing the new spring to the old springs, used springs will often test 10-15#'s less than they were originally setup after the springs have been worked some.  This is considered normal for the most typical springs on the market.  You want to look for more extreme differences of 25lbs or more.



 12 
 on: July 27, 2018, 06:53:41 pm 
Started by gresse - Last post by dennis112
None of the on car spring testers are truly 100% accurate.  Their real purpose is that they allow you to compare future readings to the original readings that you measured (using the same tool) when the springs were checked the first time.   There are also some consistency issues if you do not do not mount the tool the same place on the head of the valve or the rocker arm.  The rocker arm type mount must be pulled absolutely straight in the direction that the rocker pivots.

That being said you should first have the new spring (and one of your old springs) checked on an accurate bench mounted spring checker.  You must know the spring height to achieve the desired pressure (which would be in the comp specs.)  Then you install the new spring on your head (at the same spring height) and then check it with your overhead tool.  That will give you an accurate baseline of YOUR tool. Then you can move onto the other used springs and check their pressures.  Compare the readings to the ones you found on the new spring (and even to the used old spring you had bench checked.)

 13 
 on: July 27, 2018, 05:25:21 am 
Started by gresse - Last post by gresse
I got ahold of one new spring and changed it.
Took the car for a spin and about 6k it felt weak like valvefloat so I ordered a Moroso in car springtester.
Seat pressure should be about 245# but all was in the 180# range except the new one.
So it´s time to buy some new ones.
Anyone know how excact the Moroso tester is?
The new spring read about 210# but should be around 245#

André

 14 
 on: July 21, 2018, 07:04:59 pm 
Started by TKFD - Last post by TKFD
I  just had a PAC Beehive spring break - #4 cyl exhaust on a TFS 11R 190 head. Luckily no collateral damage. Not sure what caused it. PAC dealer says these springs are designed for high RPM and anything lower than 3K causes issues, as they are not in optimal frequency like driving around town normally or highway cruising. Im kinda not buying it.

Im replacing them with full new set to start a fresh, even though motor hasn't done a lot of work.

Beehive theory is great (lower weight, better spring design) The one thing that spooks me with them is if ones breaks nothing to prevent valve dropping in like a dual can (still limited I know, but there is a safety net there).

But anyhow...I was thinking would there be anyway to slide on a brass or copper collar 1-1.5mm above guides, to act as a stopper on the valve going into chamber if the spring does fail. Obviously loss of power and a bit of a racket from floppy spring, but these could be the tell-tale signs to shut down. Most (if not all) collateral damage is from that darn valve dropping into chamber.

Putting it on might prove to be problematic, as obviously go to be done when valve in head, but something like a soft brass or copper or alloy sleeve, with low resistance (ie, easily slide over valve shaft and easily removed).  Could be secured by very small amount high quality epoxy (similar to jb weld). I woud do the job this time with head still on. Remving the valve could be a PITA but would cross that bridge when get to it, and generally when valve needs to come out its a head rebuild anyway.

Whats everyone thoughts  Asking

 15 
 on: July 21, 2018, 03:36:07 am 
Started by gresse - Last post by TKFD
Sorry to hijack thread, but I also just had a PAC Beehive spring break - #4 cyl exhaust on a TFS 11R 190 head. Luckily no collateral damage. Not sure what caused it. PAC dealer says these springs are designed for high RPM and anything lower than 3K causes issues, as they are not in optimal frequency like driving around town normally or highway cruising. Im kinda not buying it.

Im replacing them with full new set.

Beehive theory is great (lower weight, better spring design) The one thing that spooks me with them is if ones breaks nothing to prevent valve dropping in like a dual can (still limited I know, but there is a safety net there).

I was thinking would there be anyway to slide on a brass or copper collar 1-1.5mm above guides, to act as a stopper on the valve going into chamber if the spring does fail. Obviously loss of power and a bit of a racket from floppy spring, but these could be the tell-tale signs to shut down. Most (if not all) collateral damage is from that darn valve dropping into chamber.

Putting it on might prove to be problematic, as obviously go to be done when valve in head, but something like a soft brass or copper or alloy sleeve, with low resistance (ie, easily slide over valve shaft and easily removed).  

cheers



 16 
 on: July 13, 2018, 06:16:29 pm 
Started by Chickenbone - Last post by Chickenbone
I know I can wiggle the TC when I am installing it.  Didn't think about it settling downward after it is installed.  I know that when I test fitted them dry (before installing the flex plate and TC) the holes were still shifted.  The only measurements I took were the bolt spacing on both the flex plate and TC; the bellhousing flange to tip of the stud (7/16"); and the back of the flexplate to the cover plate on the back of the engine (3/4").  

 17 
 on: July 13, 2018, 05:47:21 pm 
Started by Chickenbone - Last post by 85_GT
Have you verified the hole to stud clearance out of the car?  You might just be seeing the weight of the converter pressing down against hole and have the opposite happening at the top.

 18 
 on: July 13, 2018, 04:43:40 pm 
Started by 82-GT - Last post by Chickenbone
It may be a little late for this; but I used DEI heat sleeves for the sections of my fuel line leading into the engine compartment.  If you do this, you will need to go 2 sizes larger than your line to accommodate your fittings.  I ran 1/2" line, but had to use 1" heat sleeves to slip over the 8AN fittings.

 19 
 on: July 13, 2018, 03:42:45 pm 
Started by Chickenbone - Last post by Chickenbone
I got a flex plate from the same manufacturer as the torque converter with the same results







Am I doing something wrong?  Is this a common problem?  I am giving serious consideration in sending both TC and flex plate back and ask the manufacturer to exchange with units that have been test fitted properly.

 20 
 on: July 12, 2018, 09:09:49 pm 
Started by Deviousfred - Last post by Deviousfred
Guess who is back


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