Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 16, 2018, 06:01:01 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Director PLEASE!!!!
Add your location information to your personal profile. Thanx!
435257 Posts in 37267 Topics by 9537 Members
Latest Member: Mgabski
Search: Advanced search
Advertiser Inquiries
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
 1 
 on: August 06, 2018, 05:04:02 pm 
Started by 93reefblueGT - Last post by 93reefblueGT
Selling a BAD ASS set of trickflow highports that were completely ported, built, and designed by SAM "school of automotive machinest" at their racing head division. They have alot of money into them and flow more then the 255cc TEA highports and most others I've seen. They come with brand new JESEL shaft rockers, custom designed DelWest titanium intake valves, custom designed DelWest titanium exhaust valves, Xcelyne light weight titanium retainers and titanium locks, and PSI racing valve springs. These heads flow 398cfm @ .900 and only have a few Dyno pulls on them. Never hurt and a way cheaper then putting together $4800. Also have a brand new Wiseco 4.125 bore pistons for highports that I bought brand new through Jim I could make a good deal with as well.  Email me or text for any pictures as I have alot. 93reefbluegt@gmail.com 779 770 6278

 2 
 on: July 28, 2018, 10:23:06 pm 
Started by Foxbodygirl - Last post by Foxbodygirl
Just ohm to coils. Stock coil pos to neg is .4 ohms. So that is in spec. From pos to coil terminal the reading is chaotic. Just jumps all over the place. On the msd coil, pos to neg is .4 ohms. From pos to terminal is 4.17 k ohms. That seem low to me. Read that typical readings are between 6 and 15 k ohms.

 3 
 on: July 28, 2018, 08:56:41 pm 
Started by Foxbodygirl - Last post by Foxbodygirl
So this thing is still being a pita 94gt 5 speed..  Weak spark at at coil. Coil is getting 12volts. I even swapped my stock coil back over and the spark was less. Replaced the tfi module, same result. I’m beating my brains out trying to figure this out.

 4 
 on: July 28, 2018, 03:55:48 pm 
Started by angry5.0 - Last post by angry5.0
Hey guys. I have an aod with a silverfox mvb. I broke the input shaft so I took trans apart and put in a new shaft. Now when I shift into 3rd gear it's like you are pressing on the brake at the same time. It doesn't want to go without giving it alot of gas . It feels like a brake is being applied. I only drove it about 1/2 mile. Its obviously something I did putting it back together but I don't know what. Also it shifts hard into 3rd gear

 5 
 on: July 27, 2018, 07:01:07 pm 
Started by gresse - Last post by dennis112
Part of my reply disappeared in the process????

Anyways the difference in pressure of the new valve that you found could be due to not having the same installed height as Comp specifies.  If the height is taller, the pressure will be less.  As far as comparing the new spring to the old springs, used springs will often test 10-15#'s less than they were originally setup after the springs have been worked some.  This is considered normal for the most typical springs on the market.  You want to look for more extreme differences of 25lbs or more.



 6 
 on: July 27, 2018, 06:53:41 pm 
Started by gresse - Last post by dennis112
None of the on car spring testers are truly 100% accurate.  Their real purpose is that they allow you to compare future readings to the original readings that you measured (using the same tool) when the springs were checked the first time.   There are also some consistency issues if you do not do not mount the tool the same place on the head of the valve or the rocker arm.  The rocker arm type mount must be pulled absolutely straight in the direction that the rocker pivots.

That being said you should first have the new spring (and one of your old springs) checked on an accurate bench mounted spring checker.  You must know the spring height to achieve the desired pressure (which would be in the comp specs.)  Then you install the new spring on your head (at the same spring height) and then check it with your overhead tool.  That will give you an accurate baseline of YOUR tool. Then you can move onto the other used springs and check their pressures.  Compare the readings to the ones you found on the new spring (and even to the used old spring you had bench checked.)

 7 
 on: July 27, 2018, 05:25:21 am 
Started by gresse - Last post by gresse
I got ahold of one new spring and changed it.
Took the car for a spin and about 6k it felt weak like valvefloat so I ordered a Moroso in car springtester.
Seat pressure should be about 245# but all was in the 180# range except the new one.
So it´s time to buy some new ones.
Anyone know how excact the Moroso tester is?
The new spring read about 210# but should be around 245#

André

 8 
 on: July 21, 2018, 07:04:59 pm 
Started by TKFD - Last post by TKFD
I  just had a PAC Beehive spring break - #4 cyl exhaust on a TFS 11R 190 head. Luckily no collateral damage. Not sure what caused it. PAC dealer says these springs are designed for high RPM and anything lower than 3K causes issues, as they are not in optimal frequency like driving around town normally or highway cruising. Im kinda not buying it.

Im replacing them with full new set to start a fresh, even though motor hasn't done a lot of work.

Beehive theory is great (lower weight, better spring design) The one thing that spooks me with them is if ones breaks nothing to prevent valve dropping in like a dual can (still limited I know, but there is a safety net there).

But anyhow...I was thinking would there be anyway to slide on a brass or copper collar 1-1.5mm above guides, to act as a stopper on the valve going into chamber if the spring does fail. Obviously loss of power and a bit of a racket from floppy spring, but these could be the tell-tale signs to shut down. Most (if not all) collateral damage is from that darn valve dropping into chamber.

Putting it on might prove to be problematic, as obviously go to be done when valve in head, but something like a soft brass or copper or alloy sleeve, with low resistance (ie, easily slide over valve shaft and easily removed).  Could be secured by very small amount high quality epoxy (similar to jb weld). I woud do the job this time with head still on. Remving the valve could be a PITA but would cross that bridge when get to it, and generally when valve needs to come out its a head rebuild anyway.

Whats everyone thoughts  Asking

 9 
 on: July 21, 2018, 03:36:07 am 
Started by gresse - Last post by TKFD
Sorry to hijack thread, but I also just had a PAC Beehive spring break - #4 cyl exhaust on a TFS 11R 190 head. Luckily no collateral damage. Not sure what caused it. PAC dealer says these springs are designed for high RPM and anything lower than 3K causes issues, as they are not in optimal frequency like driving around town normally or highway cruising. Im kinda not buying it.

Im replacing them with full new set.

Beehive theory is great (lower weight, better spring design) The one thing that spooks me with them is if ones breaks nothing to prevent valve dropping in like a dual can (still limited I know, but there is a safety net there).

I was thinking would there be anyway to slide on a brass or copper collar 1-1.5mm above guides, to act as a stopper on the valve going into chamber if the spring does fail. Obviously loss of power and a bit of a racket from floppy spring, but these could be the tell-tale signs to shut down. Most (if not all) collateral damage is from that darn valve dropping into chamber.

Putting it on might prove to be problematic, as obviously go to be done when valve in head, but something like a soft brass or copper or alloy sleeve, with low resistance (ie, easily slide over valve shaft and easily removed).  

cheers



 10 
 on: July 13, 2018, 06:16:29 pm 
Started by Chickenbone - Last post by Chickenbone
I know I can wiggle the TC when I am installing it.  Didn't think about it settling downward after it is installed.  I know that when I test fitted them dry (before installing the flex plate and TC) the holes were still shifted.  The only measurements I took were the bolt spacing on both the flex plate and TC; the bellhousing flange to tip of the stud (7/16"); and the back of the flexplate to the cover plate on the back of the engine (3/4").  

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines



408 Stroker